How old is too old to learn how to ride a horse and?

October 25th, 2009

take care of horses? I’m going to be (ahem) 37 and I’ve always wanted a horse. Now I’m looking to buy some land and really change my lifestyle. I’ve always known it’s a lot of work, but I’m learning now that there’s way more to it than people let on… Any opinions would be helpful.

I thought you were going to say you were like 70!

First, 37 is definitely not too old to learn to ride a horse or to buy a horse.

Keep in mind the costs and supplies involved: vet (you can give your own vaccinations, but can’t draw Coggins if you’re going to travel with your horse), farrier, feed (sweet feed and hay), brushes, curry combs, halters, lead ropes, bridles, rerins, bits, saddles, pads, girths, muck buckets, pitchforks, feed scoop, shovel, spreader, tractor, water buckets, ground feeders, salt and mineral blocks, topical ointments (furazone, hoof treatment, blood stop, etc), vet wrap, animalintex, roll cotton, thermometer, stethoscope, water trough, needles and syringes, wash sponges, squeegies, shampoo, conditioner, mane detangler, etc. You’ll also want to clean your tack and keep water buckets and ground feeders clean. If keeping your horse in a barn, you’ll want to disinfect the barn once a month to kill germs that cause colds and such (I use a bleach/water solution and a pump sprayer). You may want to use cross ties for saddling or for the farrier, although it isn’t necessary.

When purchasing a horse, learn what to look for…ignore the color! Check the feet. If they are sound, move up to the ankle and up the leg to the shoulder, etc. Check the teeth to help determine the horse’s age. If can take a little practice but there are some website that can help with that.

Decide what type of riding you want to do and select a horse that is appropriate. For example, if you want to run barrels, cut or rein…a quarter horse would be the most suitable. If you want to trail ride and cover as much ground as possible but still be comfortable, try a gaited horse like a Tennessee Walker, a Rocky Mountain, or a KY Mountain saddle horse. That’s what I have. If you are interested in dressage, show jumping or cross country…try a thoroughbred or thoroughbred X, a holsteiner or Trakener (sp?). For endurance racing try an Arabian.

Be sure you can ride the horse several times before you purchase it. If you are not permitted to ride the horse in a wide open area (large field or trail system) you might want to look elsewhere. Pop in unannounced to see the horse. Sometimes a hard to catch horse will be put up ahead of tiem, so you can’t see how hard it is to catch.

If you’d like more information, please email me at jh2671@aol.com. Hope this helps!

37 Responses

  1. FRANKFUSS Says:

    Never too late to learn. The only limitation is your physical capabilities, and willingness to learn. I’ve been riding since I was about 4-5, and my mother learned when she was in her late 30;s. Everyone is different, but if you really want to do something, there should be no obstacles.
    References :

  2. David's mom Says:

    You’re NEVER too old. You may be pretty sore after riding, so do it in moderation as you would with working out. Don’t try to do too much too fast. Your body will have to adjust. Enjoy it, it is fun, relaxing, and a great way to relax!
    References :

  3. sf49er444life Says:

    your never to old to learn somthing new.
    References :

  4. catherine k Says:

    You are never to old to learn to ride, I learnt when I was 8 years of age, I havnt ridden for about 14 years so itwould be like st.arting over again and I have years on you so go for it
    References :

  5. Justin H Says:

    I would say you are only too old when you are physically unable to handle the demands of riding a horse and taking care of one. As long as you are physically capable, there wouldn’t be anything wrong with starting when you’re 80.
    References :

  6. Madison Says:

    No age is too old, but you need to make sure you have enough time and financial stability to keep horses though. Horses are more expensive than most people seem to think and they do need a lot of grooming which requires time. You’ll spend anywhere between $500 and $5,000 buying each horse. Go here and they explain the average cost of the food, shoes, and everything a horse needs: http://learninghorses.blogspot.com/2007/01/real-cost-of-horse-boarding.html
    References :

  7. fightingstatue Says:

    my friend spent 800-900 dollars a month just in food thats not including shelter and that was 99 um as far as riding i rode for the first time at 24 and i was a natural its great your never too old to enjoy life
    References :

  8. just me Says:

    I’m 34 and just bought my first horse last year…I started out feeling like I will NEVER understand what these "horse people" are talking about!! So many weird words!!! I remember going to buy my first saddle, and another customer in the tack shop was like, " You look like you know a lot about horses…I am using a Tom Thumb bit, but was going to change to a curb or a jointed snaffle, what do you think??" uh, WHAT??!!! lol…. I had NO idea what she was talking about!!! I spend a lot of time reading books, magazines, watching RFDTV, talking to local horse people, my vet, and the people on Y/A… I now feel a ton more confident in my ability to hold a somewhat decent conversation with someone about horses…I even know more than my father in law who has had them his whole life!!

    It doesn’t matter how old you are, just really do the research so that you can feel more comfortable. Keep in mind, that everyone who owns horses thinks that their way is the right way…You have to take everything w/ a grain of salt and find what works best for you.

    Good luck to you, and feel free to email me if you have any questions!! (I’m no expert, but since I have NOT been doing this my entire life, I can maybe help you on what worked for me!)
    References :

  9. lover_of_paints_&_quarter_horses Says:

    A million people beat me to it but I’ll say it anyway – YOU ARE NEVER TOO OLD! Riding horses is good for the soul! :-)
    References :
    26 years with horses in my life

  10. ju ju Says:

    you are never to old
    References :

  11. ibbibud Says:

    Start small. Take some lessons at a stable, then lease or buy a horse and board it. Learn all you can by reading, asking a jamillion questions, watching videos. There’s a nice book called "Horsekeeping on a Small Acreage", I think. It gives you a LOT of good advice and ideas. I’d get you a link, but my search engine seems to be on vacation …right around the Bermuda Triangle. It won’t let me search anything.
    References :

  12. Fancys_Mamma Says:

    never too late im 41 i rode when i was younger up until 23 then got out of it raising kids and such now as 41 i have gotten back into horses riding its a blast just remember your bones break easier now
    References :

  13. Bink Says:

    It is NEVER to late to learn to ride and care for a horse..it is the greatest thing in the world!
    Go For IT!
    References :

  14. mike093068 Says:

    A 62 year old woman just bought her first horse from me and is taking riding lessons with it. She wants to trail ride with her grand kids…… Never too old and 37 isnt old :)
    References :

  15. Aldie Says:

    You’re not too old. You’re never too old!

    The first thing I’d do is read, read, read all you can. Go out and buy a book on the basics of horse care. Get a subscription to a magazine.

    Is there a college near-by that offers some horse classes? I know the college I go to offers some one credit/under $100 classes.

    Read all you can. Talk to people who have horses. That’s the best route to go, in my own opinion.
    References :
    Animal Science/Equine Management major.
    Riding since 1998.

  16. blondie Says:

    why dont you learn how to ride first and then see how it goes. dont buy one right away, theyre a lot of work. and youre never too old to learn how to ride! =)
    References :

  17. chillin' with my horse Says:

    Never to ild. Horseback riding is for everyone! It’s so much fun, you have to learn how.
    References :

  18. meagan1001 Says:

    Woa dont you Ahem 37 girl that isnt to old to start riding. If thats the path you want to take that awesome and its never to late. Riding is the most enjoyable thing you can do I think it is so great that you want to take up some thing like this. It can be really tough some times and pricey but at the end of the day you have a companion. Just take every thing 1 step at a time because owning a horse for the first time can be very over whelming if you just dump it all out at the same time. Good luck Girl
    References :

  19. teenytiny Says:

    never to late but if you have never done it before then work at a stable even if you work for free, I have found I don’t mind the heavy work, but most horse owners won’t touch a turd they’d rather oay someone, you may find you’d rather pay board, of course even if you own you can hire people to care for them. I find cleaning 7 horse stalls feeding watering turning out can take 4 hours more if its winter, grass needs to be mowed in the fields thats more time. If you haven’t done this before then I’d advise doing what I did and work at a barn, you may even get free riding lessons,
    I rode my first horse at age 22, but have cleaned up after then when I was 19, you’re first ride you are really sore the next day and it’s like you worked out but after a while you build muscle tone.
    If you aren’t fit then get fit.
    Horses are panicy animals and look to you to be the calm one, they will disrepect you if you aren’t.
    Most horses are looking for a leader, but they can and will be lazy, horses are rarely dumb.
    Let your first horse be a gelding, I’d advise two horses.
    Try viewing the horse under saddle and in the field before buying it, maybe try and buy a school horse.
    If you can get 10 to 15 acres or more, you only need part to be completely for the horse more land means trails and fun.
    I have learned some interesting things about horses
    . If you leave your horse out most of the time in a field with other horses it is way healthier stays sounder and requires less care.
    When you work at a barn you can figure out the cost of a horse.
    It’s a good idea to stable a horse some of the time esp. of he works hard or you plan on shows, events.
    Before you buy land make sure it draind well, you won’t belive how much a horse tears up a yard.
    make your pasture yard as big as possible and make sure you can split it in two, many people put up temp fencing or have two pastures. Horses can turn acres into mud.
    two yards means one can rest.
    For small pastures turn out is a good way to keep them from tearing a pasture up, many horses are fine with being in a stall for the worst part of any given day. In the summer keep horses stalled and turn out at night, winter the opposite, any horse that is worked alot and alot is going on in the barn will be ok with a stall. If you will be gone most of the time then they need to be outside.
    Some day I plan on getting a horse too. I want my to live out, but partial stall time will mean they won’t dread being in a stall.
    Good luck
    References :

  20. Loves the Ponies Says:

    I thought you were going to say you were like 70!

    First, 37 is definitely not too old to learn to ride a horse or to buy a horse.

    Keep in mind the costs and supplies involved: vet (you can give your own vaccinations, but can’t draw Coggins if you’re going to travel with your horse), farrier, feed (sweet feed and hay), brushes, curry combs, halters, lead ropes, bridles, rerins, bits, saddles, pads, girths, muck buckets, pitchforks, feed scoop, shovel, spreader, tractor, water buckets, ground feeders, salt and mineral blocks, topical ointments (furazone, hoof treatment, blood stop, etc), vet wrap, animalintex, roll cotton, thermometer, stethoscope, water trough, needles and syringes, wash sponges, squeegies, shampoo, conditioner, mane detangler, etc. You’ll also want to clean your tack and keep water buckets and ground feeders clean. If keeping your horse in a barn, you’ll want to disinfect the barn once a month to kill germs that cause colds and such (I use a bleach/water solution and a pump sprayer). You may want to use cross ties for saddling or for the farrier, although it isn’t necessary.

    When purchasing a horse, learn what to look for…ignore the color! Check the feet. If they are sound, move up to the ankle and up the leg to the shoulder, etc. Check the teeth to help determine the horse’s age. If can take a little practice but there are some website that can help with that.

    Decide what type of riding you want to do and select a horse that is appropriate. For example, if you want to run barrels, cut or rein…a quarter horse would be the most suitable. If you want to trail ride and cover as much ground as possible but still be comfortable, try a gaited horse like a Tennessee Walker, a Rocky Mountain, or a KY Mountain saddle horse. That’s what I have. If you are interested in dressage, show jumping or cross country…try a thoroughbred or thoroughbred X, a holsteiner or Trakener (sp?). For endurance racing try an Arabian.

    Be sure you can ride the horse several times before you purchase it. If you are not permitted to ride the horse in a wide open area (large field or trail system) you might want to look elsewhere. Pop in unannounced to see the horse. Sometimes a hard to catch horse will be put up ahead of tiem, so you can’t see how hard it is to catch.

    If you’d like more information, please email me at jh2671@aol.com. Hope this helps!
    References :
    http://www.equusite.com
    http://www.infohorse.com
    http://www.equineinfo.com

  21. PMU Owner Says:

    Oh my gosh, I’m 52 and bought property 5 years ago to keep horses on. I do eventing and dressage. My mother is 82 and still rides, albeit slowly.

    I wish you lived in Florida, you could come out to my farm and find out what it is all about. That’s the best way, go help someone on their farm for awhile. Join a club in the riding style you are interested in.

    Yes, its a low of work, but well worth it if you truly love horses.

    Last year I rescued 10 PMU mares and foals. Four of the mares had babies this past April. I found good homes for most of them, but the rewards are hard to describe the feeling you get when you go out to feed every morning when they whinny to you.
    References :

  22. neoskya Says:

    It is never to late to learn! I made my mom learn how to ride when she was 56. She picked it up just fine.
    ps>don’t say 37 is old…lets go with 50 for the cut off.
    References :

  23. Julie M Says:

    I 2nd "just me." There is no age limit. Just make sure your well informed. RFDTV is one great source. I was raised around horses. I really got "back" into it around age 25 and learn SO much from RFDTV and talking to people. GOOD LUCK.
    References :
    LIFE

  24. tobylove4 Says:

    you are never to old or to young to learn!!!!!
    References :

  25. Brittney C Says:

    Well before even thinking about buying a horse you should learn how to ride for at least a few years but you say you are learning so OK. I would do a lease first at a lesson barn. You are NEVER to old to learn and experience the joys of horses. Just take some lessons first. Ask an instructor for his or her opinion on whether or not they think your ready.
    References :

  26. Mulereiner # Says:

    I’m giving lessons to 60yr old twin sisters that just bought their first horse. They had to learn to saddle and bridle 3 mules, how to halter properly. All the safety aspects of riding, how to check bad tack.

    Then they rode on the 2nd lesson……

    I would say your never too old.
    References :

  27. simplyme Says:

    As long as you recognize the work and money involved there is no such thing as too old. Thats the great thing about horses, you can ride for as long as you want, and you can start whenever you want. It might take you longer to get completely comfortable with some of the aspects of riding (only because young kids adjust to it faster) but be patient and stay passionate and you’ll have a great time!
    References :

  28. westerngamergirl Says:

    its never too old to ride/learn… i know a guy who games and he is 76-78 i believe… he’s the oldest in all 3 associations in our area… not sure if he is THE oldest, doubt it, but he is GOOD. like in- the- top- 3- fastest- in-the- super- senior- age- group fast
    References :

  29. Lizzy Says:

    your never too old to ride as long as you are in good shape and can handle the strenuous exercise go for it… you might want to consider rescuing a horse or getting an older one. good luck
    References :

  30. Colleen S Says:

    My mom was between 50 and 55 (closer to 55) when she really learned how to ride (as much as she is willing) and how to take care of horses.
    Of course, my mom was 39 when she had me. Personally, I think having a child is more work and a heck of a lot scarier than taking care of a horse.
    Just make sure whatever horse you buy you feel comfortable with and that you use common sense when working with them.
    Good luck.
    References :

  31. Strive for Perfection Says:

    As long as you can physically manage to sit on a horse it’s never too late to learn. I know people who started at 50+ years old and are doing great at both riding and taking care of their horses. If you have the will to learn, go for it.
    References :

  32. Kitty Kat Says:

    you’re NEVER too old!!! but be sure you know what ur getting into with this whole change of lifestyle!
    References :

  33. Molly T Says:

    your never to old to learn how to ride! i’m giving my dad riding lessons now and he’s 57!
    it’s great exersize, and it’s REALLY fun!
    References :

  34. nettskee Says:

    I first started riding lessons, having never really ridden, at 45. Now I’m 52, trail ride every summer for days on end with friend’s horses. Looking to buy my own first horse this year! Only as old as you feel!

  35. Animal lover886 Says:

    Oh, i feel kind of silly now, i’m 12 and i thought i was too young :)

  36. Mary strong Says:

    I am 47 years old just bought a quarter horse and lease it to a disabled rider program- it cuts the cost down . I am responsible for vet bills and the purchase price they they feed board groom and train and exercise him. I just started lessons and my daughter has a new best friend she rides in the disabled rider program. It is life changing and a great way to learn and I am a city girl livnig in SF!

  37. Scarlett Says:

    “How old is too old to learn how to ride a horse and?
    | We Make It Easy” was in fact a beneficial blog.
    If merely there was much more blogs similar to this one on
    the actual the net. Anyways, thanks a lot for ur precious time, Hollis

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