What is the calmest horse to learn how to ride on? (English Riding)?

December 18th, 2009


The breed of the horse doesn’t matter, its the temperament and the experience of the horse. I know some feisty cobs and some dopey thoroughbreds so I wouldn’t just go by stereotypes if your looking for a calm horse. What you need is a School Master, this is horse that knows it’s job inside out and is considered the safest type of horse. These are normally older horses that have been there, done that and got several t-shirts! They can teach a novice rider alot and are very good for building confidence. Good luck! x

15 Responses

  1. Bozema Says:

    It depends on the individual horse as much as anything. Although I learned English style originally, I learned it on a quarter horse, which is often associated with western style.

    A well trained older horse with patience for a green rider regardless of breed is the best choice.
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  2. Angie Says:

    It really depends on the horse. I know that they say Thoroughbreds and Arabians are hot blooded, meaning they’re very high spirited, frisky. But I’ve rode some that are as calm as can be. Whereas some Quarter Horses that I’ve rode will give you a run for your money, they’re very hot.
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  3. cloclo269 Says:

    Crosby’s are the best quality–they are actually made in England
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  4. PHat Troll Eater Says:

    For me personally, it’s been quarter horse x arab crosses.

    But I’ve met calm schoolmasters from TBs to Drafts to Standardbreds to ponies.
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  5. Eventer4life Says:

    There is really no specific breed it all depends on the horses personalty the first pony i rode was a shetlandx and he was really calm but i have also ridden a shetlandx that would take off with her riders. The best thing to do would be to go to a lesson barn they have horses specifically trained to be beginners horses.
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  6. 1024 Says:

    A quiet, well trained horse under the direction of a well trained trainer is your best bet.

    I am assuming you meant which breed, but breeds are irrelevant. It’s training that matters. A reputable riding instructor will never put you on a horse that isn’t very quiet, if you’re a beginner.
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  7. Marta H Says:

    No matter what breed, I’d advise an older horse. Even if you are an experienced rider, it’s best to stick to a horse that won’t pull any tricks on you while your getting the hang of it. By the way, congrats on learning how to ride english, it’s awesome!
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  8. Brittani_Banana Says:

    Every horse is different no matter what the breed. I have met draft horses (cold blooded) that are fire breathing dragons and I have met Arabs (hot blooded) that are so lazy you can’t stand them.

    Get a good lessons horse that will put up with a green rider. It doesn’t matter what breed. Find a good lesson teacher with good lesson horses and have a blast.
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  9. Chance Says:

    That’s a broad question with many possible answers. If you ‘re talking breeds, quarter horses are usually good, but it really depends on the horse and it’s temperament and training.
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  10. Jeff Sadler Says:

    People really need to quit asking "which breed is best for….?". Sorry, I am not trying to be rude (I know it probably sounded that way though). But each individual horse MUST be judged on its own merit.

    I have seen Arabians that were safe to put kids on (I have one!). But they are generally too hot blooded for the vast majority of people. On the other hand the quarter horses (generally renowned for their calmness) are sometimes absolutely bonkers.

    I recently trained and sold to a little girl a half fox trotter half arab that is so protective of her that I feel she would attack anything that tried to hurt the girl or put her in real danger. That horse is so calm that she does better on trails than most of the older horses. The horse is just three.

    My 6 year old little girl rides a grade fox trotter, who is not quite four. She has been riding her for a little over a year and a half now (mostly being ponied but more recently by herself). The only trouble we have had from her is she tried to get some dogs that barked at her and Savannah. She is probably the calmest horse on the trail rides we go to. In fact I was offered $2000 for her and the woman told a friend she would be willing to pay $5000 for her. Pretty good for a grade horse!

    So this is a long winded explanation of why you look at individual horses and stop worrying about a particular breed. The only time I look at breeds is to look for breeding stock or to look for animals I want to train and resale for a profit. But for calmness look at the horse and how it handles.

    What you need to look for is a horse that likes people. One that comes up to you in the field just to be petted. Then make sure it respects you and your space. Lack of respect is a sign of being spoiled. Make sure it acts sensible and does not freak at strange things. Pull a handkerchief or other harmless object out of your pocket slowly and watch the horses reaction. If it is curious… best. If it is curious but cautious… good. If it is scared but does not run away, but instead stays while it shies a little when approached slowly with it…workable. If it freaks and runs away…look elsewhere.
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  11. Sassy the school horse! ps:im cj Says:

    I believe your trainer(instructor) will give you the horse thats the calmest he/she has . So i wouldnt worry about picking one . They will pic the beginner horse which is usually calm , (<i know i just said that) . Trust your instructor to give you the right calm horse to ride ;)
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    Both stables i went to gave me a calm horse .

  12. jessica b Says:

    i like my halphlinger just make shure their calm most of them are but i heard they are good for kids i am currently training 1 know and hes great
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  13. clairey_dee Says:

    The breed of the horse doesn’t matter, its the temperament and the experience of the horse. I know some feisty cobs and some dopey thoroughbreds so I wouldn’t just go by stereotypes if your looking for a calm horse. What you need is a School Master, this is horse that knows it’s job inside out and is considered the safest type of horse. These are normally older horses that have been there, done that and got several t-shirts! They can teach a novice rider alot and are very good for building confidence. Good luck! x
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  14. lisa Says:

    i like a quarter horse but it depends on the age of horse
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    my first horse was a quarter horse

  15. cuervokid Says:

    English is a style off riding,in my experience a quarter horse
    is an all around horse for all style of riding. they are very calm,but remember that the horse is only as good as the rider and trainer
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    Have had several horses and the quarter has been my favorite,because they are so easy to get along with and calm!
    They are the easyest to train

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